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George Graham

Professor    
Education

Ph. D., Brandeis University, 1972
B.A., Fordham University, 1967

Specializations

Philosophy of mind; philosophical psychopathology (philosophy and psychiatry)

Biography

Dr. Graham will not be in the Department in the academic year 2015-2016.
Associate Faculty, Neuroscience Institute

He joined the department at GSU in 2008, having previously taught at Wake Forest University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

For the past several years the main focus of his research has been at the crossroads between philosophy and psychiatry. That crossroads forms a busy intersection where a number of problems in philosophy and psychiatry meet: the problem of the metaphysics of mental illness, the problem of explanatory pluralism versus inter-theoretic reduction, the problem of epistemic self-management, the question of the aim of psychiatric diagnosis, the question of the role of empathetic understanding of illness, and the problem of normative assessment of human conduct. Nor is that a complete list. In one form or another he has had things to say about each of these problems as well as related problems.

His recent research activity includes a revision/second edition of The Disordered Mind (2013). He also co-edited and authored a chapter for The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry (2013). Just recently he completed a book on religious/spiritual delusion, which Oxford University Press is publishing. It is entitled The Abraham Dilemma: A Divine Delusion. He is now working with Robert McCauley (Emory) on a book at the intersection of the cognitive science of religion and the theory of mental illness and disorder. Research and composition is being funded by The Templeton Foundation.

His research also includes joint work with Terence Horgan (Arizona) and John Tienson (Memphis) on consciousness and intentionality. Their papers have appeared in a variety of journals and books including The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind (2009). His entry on Behaviorism written years ago for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy has just been revised.

Since coming to GSU, he has taught courses on consciousness and intentionality, cognitive science, philosophy of mind, philosophy and mental illness, and metaphysics.

(On leave Fall 2015 and Spring 2016, Templeton Grant.)